KFC Malaysia shows support for International Women’s Day

It is always nice to receive news regarding events that celebrate and demonstrates appreciation towards women. In celebration of International Women’s Day, the KFC divisions in Malaysia have appointed a female figure as the new face of the company. The guest of honor in the discussion is Claudia, Colonel Sanders’ second wife whom he met through their former employment relationship. She was employed as a server at Sanders Café, Colonel Sanders’ first dining establishment – as revealed by Business Insider. Subsequently, Claudia became a prominent figure due to her contribution and role in the success of the fast food franchise that is now available across the world.

 “Mrs. Sanders played a very important role in the success of KFC. While the Colonel was busy promoting his chicken and running the company, she took orders in the restaurant, mixed the secret blend of herbs and spices, and as you know, in those days there were no courier services, so she had to take the orders to the train station for shipping,” Merrill Pereyra, the CEO of QSR Brands, the corporation that KFC establishments in Malaysia ultimately belongs to, conveys to audience in a video posted on Youtube.

This video, aside from justifying the move, serves as an introduction to Claudia.

Claudia played an integral part in the business and is no stranger to the general public. As a matter of fact, she has had previous encounters with the media.

In an early interview with Claudia, the Associated Press quoted, “While he was out selling, I was home doing the work.”

Claudia’s significant contribution is clearly acknowledged and illustrated in her obituary produced by the Associated Press back in 1997.

”We could not have been the company we are now without Claudia’s contributions,” David Novak, KFC’s president and chief executive expresses with gratitude.

No matter how far women have come in terms of achieving equal rights in legal proceedings, the progress in society and political aspects remain ostensible. We have arrived at an era in which women are contending for equal treatments in our daily lives. This is an aspect that does not have an exact standard of measurement, which is why an event like this is significant.

“To all women of KFC and the world out there, we would like to say that your future is always bright, equal, safe and rewarding. Keep inspiring us and impacting lives and thank you for all your hard work and contribution to our community, family and this organization,” Pereyra coherently articulated the firm’s attempt to show appreciation and gratitude towards women’s effort in the workplace and domestically in an interview with Marketing magazine.

This, nonetheless, is not the first demonstration of female appreciation by the KFC branches. Prior to the appointment of Claudia as the face of the company, the role of a female Sanders had belonged to another. Reba McEntire the mascot was the first appointed female counterpart of Colonel Sanders. This evidently shows KFC’s effort in advocating for gender equality. Following closely behind is another fast food chain, Mcdonalds. In honor to the International Women’s Day, McDonalds have decided to rotate the prominent ‘M’ in its logo into a ‘W’. This advertising strategy centers on the idea of ‘W’ for women.

Amidst of these strategic marketing move (and as a tribute to Claudia), many have criticized the inadequacy of their efforts. They feel that the one-day occurrence is not sufficient for the advocacy of women’s rights. Be that as it may, we should all appreciate the effort involved. Much like the fight for every other cause, we need to take it one step at a time. Regardless of the extent of a move, some is always better than none.

Let us continue to advocate and contend for gender equality and look forward to making more progress.

Featured Image via Flickr/whologwhy

Women are People, Not a Commodity

An extraordinary event transpired amidst the 19th and 20th centuries which altered the course of the history and transformed the world into life as we know it today. This century-long struggle has come to be known as the period of women’s suffrage movement. Prior to that time, long before any of us were born, women were once considered as a mere commodity just like a property. In fact, the United States in the early 1800s marked the era of white male dominance. It was a time when women were not permitted the same rights that men did, such as the right to vote as well as the right to own property.

Nonetheless, many women in countries all over the world are still considered inferior for the most part. Some examples of these places are Kuwait, Jordan, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and the most infamous of all, Egypt. The society within these countries has an ostensibly innate gender-biased predisposition towards women that still subsists today. Frequent cases of domestic violence and the little to zero number of women in business and politics can be seen as the supporting evidence for the statement above, which is why an event hosted by Saudi Arabia recently has received worldwide attention.

With the rest of the world progressing so rapidly in terms of gender equality, it should come as no surprise that the women who are residing in Saudi Arabia, one of the countries in the Middle East are making an effort to improve women’s rights. The recent event is a clear illustration of this endeavor; Their first and foremost women marathon that lasts for nearly two miles. Fifteen hundred women participated in the run, ranging from professionals such as Mizna al-Nassar to other laypersons, who are there to show their support to the cause – all age groups included. Mizna al-Nassar, a twenty-eight years old prospective Olympian who, since then, has announced her plans to enter the 2020 Olympics that will be located in Tokyo, as a representative on Saudi Arabia. She is currently pursuing a career in the line of graphic design.

She successfully crossed the finish line of the al-Ahsa run within fifteen minutes, an impressive achievement that is backed by her,

“regimented food program and training schedule supervised by professional trainer,” in addition to past experience, “I have participated in the Islamic Sport Games in Baku Azerbaijan in 2017 and in the Ladies Sport Games in Sharjah in 2018,”

– she informed Al Arabiya, a news outlet that is based in Saudi.

The “al-Ahsa Runs” took place in the Eastern province of al-Ahsa, as reported by the Anadolu Agency.

Nonetheless, all participants in the run were reported to have their abayas and hijabs on in accordance with the Sharia law. Needless to say, this was not an easy race for the women, but their determination is both admirable and inspiring for all female across the world. Several months prior to this run, these women had just overcome the law that inhibits them from driving on the streets in the country. All in all, the Middle Eastern countries are really making progress towards gender equality in recent months.

While we are extremely proud of them, we cannot help but wonder why we have to fight for these entities in our lives. Why are female frequently considered as the inferior counterpart, when we are able to perform miraculous tasks such as reproduction, in addition to bearing the astronomical amount of pain that follows. Even so, women’s rights are still on the brink today in the United States as we approach the subject of pregnancy.

If we are as far ahead as we are led to believe, why do we still have to fight for Pro-Choice?

Featured Image via Flickr/Hernán Piñera

‘Stalled Gender Revolution’ Is Awakening and Gender Equity Is on the Rise

According to a report from the Council on Contemporary Families titled “Gender Revolution Rebound Symposium,” what is known as the “Stalled Gender Revolution” of the 1990s and early 2000s is now over.

This so-called stall in gender equality progression occurred after an active period from about 1970 to 1990 where women increasingly entered the work force and closed in on education and income gaps. Then, in the 1990s and 2000s, progress not only paused but also reversed. Highly educated women “opted out” of high-power, high-paying careers to stay with children over the fear that their kids would be harmed by lack of a substantial maternal relationship. Subsequently, the wage gaps again increased.

Now, according to the report by David Cotter, a sociologist at Union College, and his co-authors, gender equality is again progressing as generations outside of just the Millennials are increasingly accepting and embracing what gender equality entails. Since 2006, all generations, conservatives and liberals alike, have seen an increase in support for gender equality—conservatives, though behind liberals, have demonstrated the greatest growth in support.

According to the survey’s findings, in 1977, 66 percent of Americans surveyed said that male breadwinner-female homemaker families are the ideal, but now less than one-third surveyed agree with that. Additionally, today 65 percent disagreed that preschool children would suffer should their mothers work. Further, over 75 percent said that both genders are equally skilled in politics. According to a report by Christine Schwartz, sociology professor at University Wisconsin-Madison, only 28 percent would assert that the husband should earn a greater salary than his wife.

Professor of history and family studies at Evergreen State College and director of Public Education at the Council of Contemporary Families, Stephanie Coontz alleged that perhaps the Great Recession is responsible for the increase in support for gender equality in the workplace and home, as it was in the Great Depression. She told The Washington Post, “It may be that this time, the recession reminded people of women’s labor, and they respected them for it.”

While perhaps gender equity in the workplace is picking up speed, our world still has a ways to go to obtain full gender equality in all aspects of life.