Talia Chetrit, a notable artist in the Armory Show 2018

Talia Chetrit is an inspirational contemporary art photographer from the United States. She was born in Washington D.C. in the year of 1982. She pursued her tertiary education in Fine Arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and was given the Fred J. Foster Fellowship Award. Following that, she received a Graduate Fellowship from the Rhode Island School of Design, where she completed the graduate program and attained her Master’s in Fine Arts. Since then, Chetrit has shifted location and is now working and living in New York.

Her first exhibition in New York was under the gallery, Plane Space for her piece entitled Items May Have Shifted in 2005. In 2008, her work was featured in “31 Under 31: Young Women in Art Photography”, curated by Lumi Tan and Jon Feinstein in 3rd Ward Brooklyn. Internationally, she has also been featured in many countries, as a group show as well as solo shows. In 2004, she was part of the 4th annual International Photography Exhibition curated by Barbara Degenevieve in the town of Pingyao in China. In addition, she presented solo at the Kaufmann Repetto gallery in Milan, Italy in 2011. A year later, one of her piece called Bodies in Trouble was featured in the Sies + Höke gallery in Düsseldorf, Germany.    

Overall, it is apparent that Chetrit has had more solo shows than collaborations, perhaps due to her unconventional approaches in the construction of her pieces.

A number of Chetrit’s works were exhibited at the Armory Show of 2018 under the Sies + Höke, a Germany-based contemporary art gallery. Two of the most remarkable pieces were both inkjet prints entitled Self-portrait (all fours), 2017 and Red Eyes, 1994/2017. The original photos that these prints were developed from are photographs that were captured by Chetrit herself, along with several of her friends back in the 1990s when she was still a mere teenage girl. These photos mark the commencement of her feminist exploration into image-making, self-representation and so forth. More often than not, there exists a personal narrative with regards to mental and emotional causes that lies beneath the surface of her projects. In another collection, Chetrit once again salvaged her old photos. This time, she uses the very first rolls of film that she had used to capture photos of her own family in the 1990s. Nonetheless, most of her pieces make passing references on the subject of sexuality and the human body.

Talia Chetrit focuses her projects on the search for deeply-veiled elements behind the structure and utilization of a photography. As a rule, she exploits the matter of obscuration, separation and distortion in a way that the person in the print is no longer identifiable. In this way, her work is conceptualized and abstracted. Aside from that, Chetrit often utilizes a monochromatic color scheme, in addition to the reversal of orientations in terms of horizontal and vertical. On top of that, she also transposes the negative and positive space in order to form more unorthodox pieces. With her nonconformist feminist mentality and methods, she has been praised by many and time and time again juxtaposed with prominent contemporary artists like Francesca Woodman and Cindy Sherman.

Talia Chetrit has had solo art exhibitions as well as collaborations with other artists under different galleries all across the world. Several more of her exhibition highlights include the Art Basel in Miami Beach last year, under Sies + Höke, the same gallery as in the Armory Show as well as the Art Düsseldorf 2017. Her pieces have been part of the Armory Show since 2014. An ongoing show that began on 16th February and will end on 25th March is located at the Kölnischer Kunstverein, an art museum in Cologne, Germany. Chetrit’s upcoming solo shows will be taking place in MAXXI, Museo delle Arti del XXI secolo, Rome. It is a national museum that consists of contemporary art and architecture.

Featured Image via flickr/ Todd Carpenter

Julian Charrière, the Conceptual Artist

“Charrière focuses on investigations of the natural world, revealing the profound force exerted by humans and the environment on one another and highlighting how ecological systems can exhibit traces of human energy,” as phrased by Artsy, the online source for fine art.

Originally from the district of Morges in Switzerland, Charrière was born in the year of 1987 and is of Swiss-French descent. He began his tertiary education in pursuance of art at the École cantonale d’art du Valais in Switzerland. However, he later transferred to the Berlin University of Arts in Germany where he eventually completed his studies under Olafur Eliasson’s Institut für Raumexperimente (Institute of Spatial Experiments) in 2013.

Julian Charrière is a Berlin-based artist who presents his work in the form of sculpture, photography and performance by way of conceptualism. The changing cultural knowledge of the natural world and its processes are key mechanisms that are explicitly present in his projects. Charrière frequently travels to remote locations such as Kazakhstan and the Southern Cone in pursuit of inspiration and knowledge of the natural sciences, in addition to the attainment of earth materials which he uses to create his artwork. He often explores distant spots that are hazardous due to their exposure to natural disasters such as volcanoes and icefields.

“I use some scientific methods, but I would describe it more as an archeologist or geologist. I go into the field and get inspired by what I see, then I bring things back to the studio and do work,” he explains.

One of Julian Charrière’s most alluring project is the on-site performance titled Some Pigeons Are More Equal Than Others in which he collaborated with Julius von Bismarck, another renowned artist, for La Biennale di Venezia (the Venice Biennial), the 13th International Architecture Exhibition that happened in 2012. Since then, Charrière and Bismarck have worked together recurrently, notably in 2016, to produce Objects in mirror might be closer than they appear, Desert Now and so forth. Charrière has had his projects featured by Das Numen, the Berlin-based art collective, in addition to his solo art expositions. He has had his work exhibited all across the world ranging from Europe to Asia. Several of his most recent expositions were located in Parasol Unit Foundation for Art in London, Galerie Bugada & Cargnel in Paris, Dittrich and Schlechtriem in Berlin, Steve Turner Gallery in Los Angeles, Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts de Lausanne, the Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India and so on.

Charrière was presented with the Kiefer Hablitzel Swiss Art Awards first in 2013, then again in 2015. The prize-winning exhibition in 2013 is named after a quote by Buckminster Fuller – We Are All Astronauts on A Little Spaceship Called Earth. This project deals with current issues centering around the concept of occurrences that alters the relationship between space and time as well as their conditions with respect to the growth on a worldwide scale. Not long after, his piece was featured in a curated section at the Lyon Biennial of Palais de Tokyo. A year later, in 2016, Charrière was granted the Kaiserring Scholarship for Young Art. He was subsequently announced as one of the three artists who were nominated for the BMW Art Journey 2017 during Art Basel in Hong Kong. Within the same year, Charrière’s art piece was showcased in Viva Arte Viva, the 57th international Art Exhibition curated by Christine Macel for La Biennale di Venezia.

For the Armory Show that took place over the past few days, a number of Julian Charrière’s pieces were featured under the Dittrich and Schlechtriem gallery. Two of the most exclusive sets were the Future Fossil Spaces – materials used include salt from the Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia and acrylic containers filled with lithium-brine. It is an installation comprising of three hexagonal towers constructed by salt and plaster. The other piece is titled Bokbata II – Terminal Beach, 2016 and is presented in the form of a sizeable monochromatic photograph.

“To date, his works has explored post-romantic constructions of ‘nature’, and staged tensions between deep or geological timescales and those relating to mankind. Charrière’s approach further reflects upon the mythos of the quest and its objects in a globalized age. Deploying seemingly perennial imagery to contemporary ends, his interventions at the borderline of mysticism and the material encapsulate our fraught relations with place today,” concluded by Julian Charrière’s online platform.

Featured Image via Dage – Looking For Europe

Aspire Heads to NYC; Creativity, Achievements and Education to be Highlighted

Whether it be food, business, or fashion New York City has well-earned it reputation as the greatest city in the world. New York City is also known for its diverse creativity. In February, it hosts an event that will hopefully bring inspiration to artist over the world. The event is called the ASPIRE FESTIVAL.

ASP FEST, created by iConcept Media, seeks to give aspiring talent exposure to thousands of people. The audience, in turn, has the chance to get closer to artists who have dedicated so much time to their work. It is the Aspire Series’ hope that not only the artists, but the audience as well, benefit from the event.

The anticipation for what Aspire has in store continues to build as the inaugural event, the first of many like it, draws near. A range of 25 to 50 artists will display their talents. Aspire says that exhibits will vary from fashion, film, cooking, and performing and fine arts. Audiences can look forward to parties, inspirational speeches and conversations as well as art exhibitions each day of the event.

Three various artists will have the opportunity to present their talent within nineteen minute segments. During the segments, the artists will get their chance to perform, converse it the audience, or be interviewed by the host.

After its time in New York City, Aspire says it plans to head to Art Basel Miami Beach. Art Basel Miami Beach has its own set of extraordinary talent. As for New York City, the event will take place from February 23rd to February 26th and hopes to shine light on the imaginative accomplishments of creative minds from around the globe.

Hybrid Tree Produces 40 Varieties of Fruit

A certain type of tree has been popping up throughout the United States and has been described as “magical.” These trees produce 40 different varieties of fruit. These trees generate several types of peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines and cherries.

Throughout the year, however, these trees look completely normal. It is only in the spring that these trees blossom into their colorful form. Each tree of this type has its own, unique collection of stone fruit.

The project to create this tree species began in 2008 when Sam Van Aken, Syracuse University sculptor and artist, found that an abandoned New York-state orchard held varieties of stone fruit that were 200 years old. When Aken learned that the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station was under-funded and thereby being forced to shut down, Aken formed his idea that could revolutionize food production. Aken took advantage of the fact that some of the trees in this station were extremely rare, perhaps even the last of their kinds.

In order to salvage the orchard plant, Aken bought the orchard and began his experimentation with a method known as “chip grafting.” Aken was able to perform this grafting process by initially planting a working tree, or the “real” tree. From there, he formed a plan to make all of the grafted species blossom at the same time.

“I’ve been told by people that have [a tree] at their home that it provides the perfect amount and perfect variety of fruit. So rather than having one variety that produces more than you know what to do with, it provides good amounts of each of the 40 varieties. Since all of these fruit ripen at different times, from July through October, you also aren’t inundated,” Aken said of his creation.

Aken has explained that most stone fruits are easily compatible. Rather than conceptualizing this tree as a single entity, it is best understood as a series of hybridized fruit plants. Thus far, 16 of these trees have been formed and subsequently put in museums, community centers and private art collections throughout the U.S. Cities that contain the new tree species are Sante Fe, N.M.; Short Hills, N.J.; Louisville, Ky.; and Pound Ridge, N.Y.

The trees will blossom in the spring. A CGI image of what this bloom will look like has been established. The tree evidently blossoms with shades of pink, crimson and white. Then, during the summertime, they bear stone fruit.