Are we handing over the guns or our rights?

  • Crystal Ng
  • March 5, 2018
  • 0

Image: Via Flickr/ Stephen Z

Commotions about gun control have vastly arisen in recent months due to the mass shooting that took place at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, Florida on February 14th, 2018. Andrew Pollack, the parent of an 18-year-old victim in the incident, Meadow Pollack has voiced out his thoughts in the matter to the White House, the Senate House and the media across the States to put aside the gun control issues and focus on making policy changes to increase security of the schools following the mass shooting. “Gun laws are not achievable… She should have been safe in the school. That’s the problem,” Pollack expressed. He is in favor of the gun reform package proposed by the Florida Senate. He thinks the security of the schools should be equivalent to places like the courthouse and the airport, with metal detectors at the entrances and such. Pollack persistently argues that too much attention is placed on the subject of gun control, along with the media’s interference and mentions of conflict-ridden topics, rather than remaining united.

While a majority of Americans are fighting for gun control in hopes that it will reduce gun-related incidents, many neglect the basic constitutional rights that America stands on; The Second Amendment, the right to bear arms. The attempt to change gun control laws directly removes an aspect of people’s freedom and voids the supremacy of a constitutional right, in addition to the time, money and effort that could have better spent elsewhere. Aside from that, America has a longstanding concern over the education system, which could be improved by additional funding. By improving youth education and care, children will develop a healthy mind and understands the value of life. This, in turn, prevents future similar events from happening in the long term. Instead of centering all of the attention on gun control that leads to turmoil within the nation, people should direct their focus onto more achievable goals.

For a long time now, the people have expressed their antipathy for the government because of the expanding power of the government over the freedom of the citizens. An increase in gun control will undoubtedly intensify the animosity between the two sides. There will always be people who are against certain decisions made by the government, nonetheless, a protest backed up with adequate justifications and support by the majority will not culminate well. Furthermore, those who are determined to commit a crime will find a way to do so despite of the obstruction in executing the plans. Criminals will figure out a way around it, which leads to the subsistence of the black market for weapons. Consequently, criminals will still be in possession of guns while honest and upstanding citizens will not have the freedom to bear arms for the purpose of self-defense and protection.

On the other hand, gun control may effectively reduce gun-related killings, presuming that it can be achieved. Countries such as Japan, Sweden, Australia and the United Kingdom are direct pieces of evidence of the peace maintained by the implementation of strict firearms law. Nevertheless, all things aside, the people and the government should divert their attention towards the common goal to make a change in the long run by educating the people instead of the continuous debate over gun control. “The American people. We just want our schools safe. We don’t want to talk about guns right now,” says Pollack. In addition, media can be a means to raise awareness in this matter and find a way to prevent it. Instead of banning the sales of rifles and such, the government could attempt to impose heavy tax, which subsequently decreases the number of people in possession of guns and the chances of mass shootings.

Facebook Comments
Previous «
Next »

The concept of time is lost on me as I venture into the world of business, politics, technology and all other matters concerning recent events. No matter where I am; out in the big cities or isolated in the desert, writing is seemingly the only constant in my life.