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Boeing Aircraft Incident Sparks Investigation into Engine Cover Detachment

Boeing Aircraft Incident Sparks Investigation into Engine Cover
File photo: The fuselage plug area of Alaska Airlines Flight 1282 Boeing 737-9 MAX, which was forced... File photo: The fuselage plug area of Alaska Airlines Flight 1282 Boeing 737-9 MAX, which was forced to make an emergency landing with a gap in the fuselage, is seen during its investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in Portland, Oregon, U.S. January 7, 2024. NTSB/Handout via REUTERS/File photo Purchase Licensing Rights
Boeing Aircraft Incident Sparks Investigation into Engine Cover
File photo: The fuselage plug area of Alaska Airlines Flight 1282 Boeing 737-9 MAX, which was forced... File photo: The fuselage plug area of Alaska Airlines Flight 1282 Boeing 737-9 MAX, which was forced to make an emergency landing with a gap in the fuselage, is seen during its investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in Portland, Oregon, U.S. January 7, 2024. NTSB/Handout via REUTERS/File photo Purchase Licensing Rights

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Boeing Aircraft Incident Sparks Investigation into Engine Cover Detachment

The incident involving a Boeing 737-800 operated by Southwest Airlines has prompted an investigation by airline regulators in the US. During take-off, an engine cowling detached from the aircraft and struck a wing flap, prompting the flight to return safely to Denver International Airport.

The Southwest Airlines flight was en route to Houston with 135 passengers and six crew members on board. It reached an altitude of about 10,300 feet before landing back in Denver. The airline stated that its maintenance teams would conduct a review of the aircraft, which was responsible for the maintenance of the cowling.

The aircraft involved was manufactured in 2015 and belongs to an earlier generation of the Boeing 737, preceding the Max model. It was equipped with CFM56 engines, unlike the Max models, which use CFM-Leap engines.

Following the incident, the FAA confirmed that the Boeing aircraft was towed to the gate after landing. Boeing declined to comment on the matter, referring inquiries to Southwest Airlines for details regarding the aircraft and fleet operations.

Southwest Airlines stated that it would accommodate passengers on another flight to Houston, albeit with a delay of approximately three hours.

This incident adds to Boeing’s recent challenges with safety concerns and manufacturing issues. The company has been under scrutiny since a mid-air blowout in January, which led to the temporary grounding of nearly 200 Boeing 737 Max 9 jets. Additionally, Boeing has been working to rebuild its reputation following crashes involving the 737 Max planes in 2018 and 2019, which resulted in the global grounding of the aircraft for over 18 months.


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