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THE BIZNOB – Global Business & Financial News – A Business Journal – Focus On Business Leaders, Technology – Enterpeneurship – Finance – Economy – Politics & LifestyleTHE BIZNOB – Global Business & Financial News – A Business Journal – Focus On Business Leaders, Technology – Enterpeneurship – Finance – Economy – Politics & Lifestyle

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China Cracks Down: Influencer’s Accounts Closed Over Fake Story

China Cracks Down: Influencer's Accounts Closed Over Fake Story
Chinese influencer charged in Thailand for 'breaking visa laws' after video on women'... Chinese influencer charged in Thailand for 'breaking visa laws' after video on women's safety
China Cracks Down: Influencer's Accounts Closed Over Fake Story
Chinese influencer charged in Thailand for 'breaking visa laws' after video on women'... Chinese influencer charged in Thailand for 'breaking visa laws' after video on women's safety

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China Cracks Down: Influencer’s Accounts Closed Over Fake Story

Removing influencer Thurman Maoyibei’s accounts from various Chinese social media platforms has sparked discussions about the consequences of spreading fabricated stories online. Over the weekend, Maoyibei’s accounts on platforms like Douyin, Weibo, and BiliBili were taken down after disseminating a viral story about a missing homework book.

According to authorities, Maoyibei, whose real surname is Xu, and her colleague Xue produced a series of fabricated videos claiming that they found two empty homework books belonging to a Grade 1 student named Qin Lang while on holiday in Paris. The story gained traction, leading to a nationwide search for the boy and significant engagement on social media platforms.

However, investigations by Hangzhou police revealed that Xu and her colleague had fabricated the story by purchasing the books themselves. China’s Ministry of Public Security has highlighted this incident as a “typical example” of crackdowns against online rumors and falsehoods.

Maoyibei apologized, acknowledging her responsibility for disrupting the internet order and causing negative influence. She emphasized the importance of social responsibility and urged her colleagues to refrain from fabricating or spreading false content.

While some have supported the decision to close Maoyibei’s accounts, others have questioned whether the punishment was too severe for what some perceive as a “harmless joke.” This has sparked debates about the appropriate standards for online content creation and enforcing consequences for spreading misinformation.

The incident reflects broader efforts by Chinese authorities to regulate online content and combat the spread of false information, highlighting the potential legal and social repercussions for individuals and influencers who engage in such practices.


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