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Cryptocurrencies

Cryptocurrencies

UNDERSTANDING IRS GUIDANCE ON CRYPTOCURRENCY TAXES

Photo: Altcoin Buzz Photo: Altcoin Buzz
Photo: Altcoin Buzz Photo: Altcoin Buzz

UNDERSTANDING IRS GUIDANCE ON CRYPTOCURRENCY TAXES

Do you need help navigating the complicated world of cryptocurrency taxes? Then, learn everything you need about the IRS guidance on cryptocurrency taxes and avoid costly mistakes.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

 

  • Cryptocurrency is regarded as property by the Internal Revenue Service and is thus liable to taxation.
  • Selling, trading, receiving, and mining are all taxable cryptocurrency events.
  • Taxpayers must record their cryptocurrency holdings on their tax returns using designated forms.
  • A wide variety of cryptocurrency transactions fall under various reporting categories.
  • Depending on the kind of company and transactions involved, cryptocurrency taxation for companies varies.
  • Recent developments in cryptocurrency taxation include suggested amendments to tax legislation.
  • Taxpayers may be subject to fines and costs if they commit common errors while reporting cryptocurrency on their tax returns.

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Many people consider cryptocurrency a financial investment, but they may need to be made aware that their gains are subject to taxes. Taxpayers must understand their tax responsibilities when the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has guided cryptocurrency taxes. Understanding the importance of cryptocurrency taxes and defining essential words are the main goals of this essay, which will also provide a quick review of the subject.

 

Cryptocurrency is digital or virtual money protected by cryptography. It may be used to make online transactions without a centralized banking system. However, due to the IRS classification of cryptocurrency as property, it is subject to tax. Therefore, profits are taxed, while losses may be written.

 

It is impossible to stress the importance of understanding cryptocurrency taxes. Incorrectly reporting cryptocurrency transactions on tax returns may result in fines, jail time, or other legal repercussions. As a result, the IRS has shifted its attention to ensuring that taxpayers comply with tax laws about cryptocurrency as its popularity has grown.

 

“crypto” means digital or virtual and employs cryptography for security. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) collects taxes and upholds tax laws. Therefore, income, products, and services may be subject to taxation.

 

Understanding IRS guidance on cryptocurrency taxes is essential for taxpayers who invest in cryptocurrencies. Serious repercussions may result from not adhering to tax laws about cryptocurrency. We’ll explain IRS guidance on cryptocurrency taxes more thoroughly in the following sections.

 

One of the most important concepts for taxpayers to grasp is what constitutes a taxable event under cryptocurrency taxes. In the eyes of the Internal Revenue Service, buying, selling, exchanging, and receiving cryptocurrency and mining it are all taxable activities.

 

It is the taxpayer’s responsibility to determine the gain or loss from the sale or exchange of cryptocurrency by comparing the proceeds from the transaction to the fair market value of the cryptocurrency at the time of the transaction. The resulting gain or loss is then reported on the taxpayer’s tax return.

 

When you get paid in cryptocurrency, you have a taxable event. This is because the fair market value of the cryptocurrency received is included in the taxpayer’s total income and must be reported on their tax return.

 

As a last point, cryptocurrency mining is a taxable activity. Therefore, the fair market value of the cryptocurrency produced is included in the taxpayer’s taxable income and must be reported on their tax return.

 

To further complicate matters, a taxpayer may have many transactions involving the same cryptocurrency, meaning different laws may apply to each. To optimize their tax returns, taxpayers could benefit from seeking the advice of a tax expert or adopting cryptocurrency-specific software.

 

IRS AND CRYPTOCURRENCY

 

Many taxpayers holding or trading cryptocurrencies need clarification and guidance about the IRS’s position on cryptocurrency taxation. Virtual currencies like Bitcoin are subject to federal taxation by the Internal Revenue Service as property. Consequently, virtual currency transactions are subject to the same basic tax rules that apply to property transactions.

 

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released Notice 2014-21 in 2014 to give preliminary guidance on how virtual currency should be treated for tax reasons. According to the notice, virtual currency transactions are treated as property for tax reasons. As such, the same tax rules that apply to physical currency transactions also apply to virtual currency transactions. Both the taxation of mining and the tax implications of utilizing virtual currency as payment for goods and services were discussed in the notice.

 

The IRS has continued to guide the taxation of virtual currency ever since. Additional guidance on the tax treatment of cryptocurrency transactions was offered in Revenue Ruling 2019-24, published by the IRS in October 2019. The decision made it clear that taxpayers who accept cryptocurrency as payment for goods or services must report the fair market value of the virtual currency as gross income on the receipt date.

 

The IRS has produced a set of frequently asked questions (FAQs) about the tax treatment of virtual currency transactions, answering typical concerns that taxpayers may have. Frequently Asked Questions provide information on the tax status of virtual currency kept as a capital asset, virtual currency received as payment, and virtual currency used to pay for goods or services.

 

The IRS has been particularly vigilant in enforcing compliance with tax rules related to virtual currency, in addition to publishing these types of guidance publications. The IRS has begun a push to ensure taxpayers properly report and pay taxes on virtual currency gains and losses. Taxpayers who may not comply with virtual currency tax laws will be examined as part of the campaign’s outreach and education efforts.

 

For taxpayers who hold or trade virtual currency, the IRS has established a Virtual Currency Tax Center on its website that offers information and resources. The site provides information on virtual currency reporting requirements, compliance strategies, and connections to report materials, FAQs, and other resources.

 

In conclusion, the IRS has firmly regulated virtual currency and offered guidance and resources to assist taxpayers. However, to guarantee compliance with tax laws and regulations, it is important for taxpayers who hold or trade virtual currencies to understand the IRS’s definitions and guidance on currency taxation.

 

It is important to understand that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) defines cryptocurrency as “a digital representation of value that functions as a medium of exchange, a unit of account, and/or a store of value.” This definition is wide enough to include not only Bitcoin and Ethereum but any digital asset that may be used as a medium of exchange.

 

The two main types of virtual currency recognized by the Internal Revenue Service are the sale or exchange of virtual currency transactions and using virtual currency to acquire goods or services. Taxpayers must ascertain the virtual currency’s fair market value on the transaction date and report any profits or losses on their tax returns in the case of a sale or exchange of virtual currency. In addition, the virtual currency’s fair market value on the transaction date must be declared as income by the receiver when using virtual currency to acquire goods or services.

 

It is important to note that the Internal Revenue Service mandates that taxpayers maintain thorough records of their virtual currency transactions, including the date, amount, and fair market value of the virtual currency at the time of the transaction. These data will depend on the tax ramifications of virtual currency transactions and compliance with IRS reporting obligations.

 

The IRS’s guidance on cryptocurrency taxes has changed over time, and taxpayers must remain current on the most recent tax laws and regulations. Taxpayers may use the resources given by the IRS better to understand their tax responsibilities regarding virtual currency taxation. To guarantee compliance with IRS regulations, taxpayers who hold or trade virtual currency should maintain thorough records and, if required, seek expert guidance.

 

TAXABLE EVENTS FOR CRYPTOCURRENCY

 

Understanding taxable events is crucial to ensure compliance with IRS regulations and accurately reporting income taxes in cryptocurrency. Any transaction that causes a capital gain or loss for the taxpayer is referred to as a taxable event. Selling, buying, receiving, and mining virtual currencies are examples of taxable events in the case of cryptocurrency.

 

The exchange of cryptocurrency for fiat currency is the most blatantly taxable event. A taxpayer will realize a capital gain subject to taxation when they sell their cryptocurrency for more than originally purchased. Add the initial purchase price to any transaction fees to calculate the cost basis. Conversely, if a taxpayer sells cryptocurrency for less than they paid for it, the difference is a capital loss that can be used to reduce any capital gains that have been realized.

 

Another taxable event is the exchange of one cryptocurrency for another. The taxpayer is responsible for reporting any gains or losses on their tax return based on their assessment of the cryptocurrency’s fair market value at the time of the trade. A taxpayer will realize a capital gain, for instance, if they exchange Bitcoin for Ethereum and the fair market value of Ethereum is higher than the taxpayer’s cost basis for Bitcoin.

 

A taxable event includes the receipt of cryptocurrency as payment for goods or services. In this case, the recipient must report the cryptocurrency’s fair market value as income on the transaction date. For instance, Bitcoin’s fair market value on the transaction date must be reported as income on taxpayers’ tax returns if they provide a service and receive payment in Bitcoin.

 

A taxable event is the mining of cryptocurrency. When they successfully mine a new cryptocurrency block, new cryptocurrency units are issued to taxpayers. The taxpayer must report the cryptocurrency’s fair market value as income at receipt.

 

It is important to note that to comply with IRS requirements; taxpayers must maintain meticulous records of all cryptocurrency transactions, including the date and amount of the transaction, the fair market value of the cryptocurrency at the time of the transaction, and the transaction’s intended use. Penalties and interest on unreported income can be incurred if proper records are not kept.

It is important to comprehend the tax rates and reporting requirements for cryptocurrency transactions now that we have discussed taxable events in cryptocurrency transactions. The tax treatment of cryptocurrency is similar to that of stocks and bonds, with the tax rate varying depending on the taxpayer’s income level and the amount of time they hold the cryptocurrency.

 

For short-term gains (less than a year), cryptocurrency is taxed at the same rate as ordinary income, reaching as high as 37% for high-income earners. Depending on the taxpayer’s income level, cryptocurrency gains that are considered long-term (held for more than a year) are taxed at a capital gains rate of 0%, 15%, or 20%.

 

It is important to note that taxpayers who have bought, sold, or otherwise dealt in cryptocurrency must report their transactions to the Internal Revenue Service. According to the IRS, on Form 8949, which is used to report capital gains and losses, taxpayers must report all taxable transactions. In addition, the taxpayer must also use Schedule D to report their total cryptocurrency gains or losses.

 

Further, taxpayers who have received cryptocurrency as payment for goods or services must report the cryptocurrency’s fair market value at the time of the transaction as income. This amount is subject to taxation at the taxpayer’s regular income tax rate.

 

It’s also important to note that the IRS has been making more of an effort to ensure compliance with cryptocurrency tax regulations in recent years. However, over 10,000 taxpayers received letters from the IRS in 2019 who may have yet to report their cryptocurrency transactions correctly or may not have reported them.

 

In conclusion, it is crucial for compliance with IRS regulations and accurate reporting of taxable income to understand the tax rates and reporting requirements for cryptocurrency transactions. Taxpayers who have sold or exchanged cryptocurrency must report their transactions on Form 8949 and Schedule D of their tax return. Taxpayers who have received cryptocurrency as payment must report the cryptocurrency’s fair market value as income on their tax return. It is important for taxpayers who hold or trade cryptocurrency to get expert advice and maintain detailed records to ensure compliance with IRS regulations, especially in light of the IRS’s stepped-up enforcement efforts.

 

HOW TO REPORT CRYPTOCURRENCY ON TAX RETURNS

 

It may be difficult for many taxpayers to account for cryptocurrency while filing their tax returns. However, correct reporting of cryptocurrency transactions is vital for compliance with IRS requirements and to avoid fines. Reporting cryptocurrency on tax returns is covered in detail in this section, step by step.

 

  1. Determine all cryptocurrency transactions that took place throughout the tax year. This is the first step in reporting cryptocurrency on tax returns. Form 8949, used for reporting capital gains and losses, must be utilized by taxpayers to report all taxable cryptocurrency transactions.

 

  1. Taxpayers must calculate their gain or loss on each cryptocurrency transaction when all transactions have been recognized. Calculate the gain or loss by dividing the basis (the amount paid for the cryptocurrency) by the amount realized.

 

  1. Taxpayers must fill out Form 8949 after determining the gain or loss on each transaction. The date of sale or exchange, amount of proceeds, cost basis, gain or loss, and adjustments must all be reported separately for each transaction.

 

  1. Once taxpayers have completed all sections of Form 8949, they must transfer the aggregate gain or loss to Schedule D of their tax return. Schedule D is where taxpayers should report their cryptocurrency earnings or losses.

 

  1. In addition to reporting cryptocurrency transactions, taxpayers who have received cryptocurrency as payment for products or services must also report the cryptocurrency’s fair market value as income at the time of the transaction. The tax rate that applies to this income is the taxpayer’s standard rate.

 

It’s vital to remember that cryptocurrency transactions may have different reporting obligations. For example, the reporting obligations for taxpayers who have received cryptocurrency as a gift or inheritance may vary from those who sold or traded cryptocurrency.

 

In conclusion, reporting cryptocurrency on tax returns might be difficult, but it is necessary for compliance with IRS requirements and avoiding fines. Taxpayers must precisely identify all cryptocurrency transactions and calculate their gains or loss. All taxable transactions must be reported on Form 8949 and Schedule D, and taxpayers must report cryptocurrency transactions as regular income on their tax returns. Taxpayers may effectively report cryptocurrency transactions on their tax returns with the help of a tax expert and meticulous record-keeping.

 

When it comes to reporting, there are nuances between the various types of cryptocurrency transactions. Some examples are as follows:

 

  1. You need to report the sale of cryptocurrency for fiat money (such as U.S. dollars) on your tax return. In addition, you must file Form 8949 and Schedule D to report the capital gain or loss since the IRS views this as a taxable event.

 

  1. As with the purchase of cryptocurrency, exchanging one cryptocurrency for another is a taxable event. To report any resultant capital gain or loss on your tax return, you must calculate the fair market value of the cryptocurrency you received in exchange for the cryptocurrency you exchanged.

 

  1. Payment in cryptocurrency: You must report this as income on your tax return if you receive cryptocurrency as payment for products or services. To report the cryptocurrency you received as income on your tax return, you must calculate its fair market value at the time of the transaction.

 

  1. Mining cryptocurrency is regarded as self-employment by the Internal Revenue Service. Therefore, on your tax return, you will need to report the fair market value of the cryptocurrency you received as income, and you may also be required to pay self-employment taxes.

 

  1. It’s important to remember that these are only a few examples of the many types of cryptocurrency transactions that might be taxed. The IRS has issued instructions on how to report these transactions, but you should still seek the counsel of a tax expert for help with your unique circumstances.

 

To prepare for the tax consequences of cryptocurrency transactions as they become more commonplace in our society, individuals need to learn about the rules around cryptocurrency. For taxpayers to avoid penalties and fines, the IRS has offered instructions on reporting cryptocurrency on tax returns. Individuals can confidently navigate the complex world of cryptocurrency taxation by staying informed and seeking professional advice when necessary.

 

CRYPTOCURRENCY TAXATION FOR BUSINESS

 

Businesses increasingly utilize cryptocurrency as payment or investment as technology grows popular. Unfortunately, this also means that businesses must be aware of the tax ramifications of such transactions. Here we will present an overview of cryptocurrency taxation for businesses and highlight the main differences between reporting taxes for various business structures.

 

Businesses that accept cryptocurrency as payment for goods or services are subject to the same tax reporting requirements as people. If a business receives cryptocurrency as payment, the amount of income received is considered the cryptocurrency’s fair market value at the time of the transaction. The business must report this income on its tax return since it is subject to tax.

 

The tax ramifications of cryptocurrency investments for businesses are more nuanced. Any rise in value is subject to capital gains tax when the cryptocurrency is sold if it is purchased and held as an investment by a business. Long-term capital gains are taxed at a lower rate than short-term profits, and the amount of tax owing is proportional to the time the cryptocurrency was held.

 

Businesses that mine cryptocurrency must also comply with various tax reporting requirements. To verify transactions and create new cryptocurrency units, cryptocurrency mining requires difficult mathematical equations. As a result, any cryptocurrency obtained through mining is considered income and subject to taxation. Businesses that mine cryptocurrency may also be able to write off some of the costs associated with mining, such as the price of power and equipment.

 

It is also important to remember that the tax reporting requirements for cryptocurrency transactions differ based on the business’s legal form. On Schedule C of their tax return, for instance, a sole proprietorship may report cryptocurrency transactions, but a corporation may utilize Form 1120. In addition, businesses that employ cryptocurrency as an investment may also be subject to different reporting requirements, such as the Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR) reporting.

 

Accepting cryptocurrency as payment for goods or services, investing in cryptocurrency as a long-term asset, and utilizing cryptocurrency for international transactions are all examples of business transactions using cryptocurrency. To guarantee compliance with IRS requirements, it is important for businesses to maintain thorough records of all cryptocurrency transactions and to consult a tax expert.

 

As a result, businesses that utilize cryptocurrency must be aware of the tax consequences of such transactions. Even though the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued instructions for including cryptocurrency earnings in taxable income, businesses still need to consult a tax expert to be sure they meet all reporting requirements. To continue succeeding in the ever-changing world of digital currency, businesses need to be aware of the tax consequences of cryptocurrency.

 

Businesses that deal in cryptocurrency must comply with additional regulatory and tax reporting requirements. For instance, they may have to get licensed as a money services business (MSB) with the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). In addition, to combat illegal activities, including money laundering, terrorism funding, and fraud, MSBs are subject to anti-money laundering (AML) and know-your-customer (KYC) requirements.

 

Businesses that pay workers in cryptocurrency are also required to report these payments on their employees’ W-2 forms and deduct the appropriate tax amount. In addition, the cryptocurrency’s value at the time of payment must be translated to U.S. dollars to determine the employee’s taxable income.

 

Businesses that deal with cryptocurrency must be aware of their tax and regulatory responsibilities. Penalties and fines may apply if you fail to comply with these requirements. To ensure they are fulfilling all of their responsibilities and appropriately reporting cryptocurrency transactions on their tax returns, businesses need expert advice.

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RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN CRYPTOCURRENCY TAXATION

 

The IRS has regularly revised its guidance since cryptocurrency taxation is a constantly developing field. For example, notice 2014-21 was published by the Internal Revenue Service in 2014, defining cryptocurrency as property for tax reasons. This means that profits or losses on cryptocurrency transactions would be liable to capital gains tax based on the difference between the cost basis (the amount paid for the cryptocurrency) and the fair market value at the time of the transaction.

 

Revenue Ruling 2019-24, published by the IRS in October 2019, offered guidance on hard forks and airdrops. When a cryptocurrency goes through a protocol change that creates a new cryptocurrency, this is known as a hard fork. In addition, cryptocurrency holders may get free new cryptocurrency units via airdrop during a marketing or promotional effort. Holders of cryptocurrency who get new cryptocurrency units due to a hard fork or airdrop must recognize income at the time of the fork or airdrop based on the fair market value of the new cryptocurrency at the time of receipt, as explained in Revenue Ruling 2019-24.

 

The IRS released additional guidance on cryptocurrency taxation in March 2021 in Notice 2021-21. The notification guided the tax treatment of transactions using cryptocurrency stored in a wallet or accounted with a foreign exchange or custodian and clarified the term “virtual currency.”

 

Changes to cryptocurrency tax legislation and updates from the Internal Revenue Service have been proposed. One example is a provision in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act that has brokers disclose cryptocurrency transactions to the Internal Revenue Service. As a result, more cryptocurrency transactions would need to be reported, making it simpler for the IRS to track down those who need to comply.

 

These new changes in cryptocurrency taxation have far-reaching consequences for both taxpayers and businesses. It is more important than ever to properly declare cryptocurrency transactions on tax returns as the IRS is stepping up its enforcement operations and considering new reporting requirements. Taxpayers and businesses should remain current on changes to cryptocurrency tax legislation and seek expert guidance to maintain compliance.

 

The IRS has proposed changes to cryptocurrency taxation and the new guidance. There has been a suggestion to have exchanges, and custodians record all transactions to the Internal Revenue Service over a specific threshold. Increased enforcement actions may result from the IRS’s enhanced monitoring capabilities.

 

Deleting the like-kind exchange provision, which presently lets taxpayers delay taxes when trading one cryptocurrency for another, is another proposed reform. Again, the tax burden of those who engage in frequent trading may be drastically altered if this provision were deleted and taxpayers were forced to pay taxes on the transaction.

 

The proposed changes have serious ramifications for taxpayers and businesses in the cryptocurrency industry. To guarantee compliance and prevent fines and enforcement actions from the Internal Revenue Service, people and businesses must remain current on tax laws and guidance changes.

 

COMMON CRYPTOCURRENCY TAX MISTAKES

 

Taxpayers may need to correct their reporting of their transactions since cryptocurrency taxes may be complex. Here are some common cryptocurrency tax mistakes that you should steer clear of:

 

  1. A failure to report cryptocurrency transactions

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) mandates taxpayers report all cryptocurrency transactions on their tax returns, including purchases, sales, and trading. Failure to report cryptocurrency transactions may result in penalties and interest costs.

 

  1. Reporting gains and losses incorrectly

Accurately reporting gains or losses from cryptocurrency transactions is a tax obligation for all taxpayers. Form 8949 and Schedule D should be used to report the gains and losses. When calculating cryptocurrency gains and losses, taxpayers should ensure they are using the right basis.

 

  1. Those who fail to report cryptocurrency earnings as income

Cryptocurrency mined or staked should be reported as income on tax returns. Failure to report this income might result in fines and penalties.

 

  1. improper record-keeping

The taxpayer should maintain a complete record of all cryptocurrency transactions, including the date of acquisition, the purchase price, the selling price, and the sale date. Inaccurately reporting cryptocurrency transactions on tax returns might result from failing to maintain accurate records.

 

  1. Commingling corporate and private cryptocurrency transactions

Company owners need to keep their personal and professional cryptocurrency transactions separate. Inaccurate reporting of gains and losses might result from it is difficult to distinguish between personal and corporate transactions.

 

Penalties and interest may be imposed on taxpayers who make mistakes while reporting cryptocurrency transactions. Until the tax is paid in full, interest will be assessed at 1% per month on the unpaid balance.

 

Taxpayers should maintain detailed records of their cryptocurrency transactions and, if required, seek the guidance of a cryptocurrency expert to prevent frequent cryptocurrency tax mistakes. Additionally, taxpayers must report all cryptocurrency transactions on their tax returns and ensure they use their cryptocurrency’s correct basis when calculating gains and losses. Taxpayers may avoid penalties and interest from the IRS by avoiding typical mistakes when reporting cryptocurrency transactions.

 

In sum, it is essential for anybody engaging in cryptocurrency transactions to be familiar with the IRS’s guidance on such taxes. Taxpayers and businesses must understand the consequences of failing to comply with tax reporting requirements. Significant repercussions for taxpayers and businesses may result from planned changes to tax legislation and the IRS’s ongoing updates on cryptocurrency tax guidance. On the other hand, taxpayers and businesses may correctly report their cryptocurrency transactions and avoid penalties if they avoid common mistakes and remain up-to-date with current developments. If you have any queries or doubts about how cryptocurrency should be taxed, you should speak with a tax expert.

 

CONCLUSION

 

In conclusion, understanding IRS tax guidance is essential for all taxpayers and businesses engaged in tax transactions. The IRS has ramped up its enforcement of cryptocurrency tax laws in response to the asset class’s rising profile and value.

 

The perspective of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on the taxation of cryptocurrencies, taxable events in cryptocurrency transactions, reporting cryptocurrency on tax returns, taxation of cryptocurrencies for businesses, current changes in the taxation of cryptocurrencies, and frequent cryptocurrency tax errors to avoid are among the key takeaways from this article.

 

Staying current on IRS guidance on cryptocurrency taxation is essential to avoid penalties, fines, and legal complications. It is recommended that taxpayers and businesses seek expert assistance or contact IRS resources to learn more about how to comply with cryptocurrency tax laws and reporting requirements.

 

Cryptocurrency taxation is a murky and rapidly developing field of law. Taxpayers and businesses may, however, avoid expensive errors and guarantee compliance with tax laws by understanding the IRS guidance and precisely following reporting obligations.

 

Cryptocurrency investors and businesses must stay abreast of the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) guidance on cryptocurrency taxation. Failure to comply with tax laws may result in fines and legal action. Keeping meticulous records of cryptocurrency transactions, consulting a tax expert as needed, and being abreast of the most recent IRS guidance are good ways for taxpayers to avoid errors and stay compliant. More progress in cryptocurrency taxation is likely due to the increasing prevalence and use of cryptocurrencies. To comply with the law, it is essential to maintain vigilance and knowledge. The IRS website and tax experts are just two examples of the various tools accessible to taxpayers seeking guidance on handling cryptocurrency taxation. Taxpayers may avoid errors and assure compliance with tax laws by understanding and following the IRS’s guidance


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