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THE BIZNOB – Global Business & Financial News – A Business Journal – Focus On Business Leaders, Technology – Enterpeneurship – Finance – Economy – Politics & LifestyleTHE BIZNOB – Global Business & Financial News – A Business Journal – Focus On Business Leaders, Technology – Enterpeneurship – Finance – Economy – Politics & Lifestyle

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Food price fears as Brexit import charges confirmed

Food price fears as Brexit import charges confirmed
Food price fears as Brexit import charges confirmed

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The UK government has revealed a major facet of trade dynamics: the upcoming fees that businesses will have to pay to import food items after Brexit. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has announced that minor imports of a variety of products, including fish, salami, sausage, cheese and yoghurt, will be subject to tariffs starting from 30th April.

Products derived from plants, animals, or both will be subject to these costs, which are called the “common user charge,” when they enter the United Kingdom through the Port of Dover or the Eurotunnel in Folkestone. Imported goods will be subject to charges based on their classification, or the “commodity line,” with a maximum of £145 applied to mixed shipments. The new system allows for product-specific pricing of up to £29 per item.

Many in the sector are worried about how these charges may affect food costs after hearing the news. According to the Cold Chain Federation, these costs will end up affecting consumers, smaller UK merchants, or EU importers. The head of the Federation, Phil Pluck, stressed that businesses’ spending will go up due to these extra expenditures, which might mean higher food prices and less options for customers. Because these penalties were announced so suddenly, affected businesses have had very little time to make the necessary adjustments to their commercial activities.

Even though the government says these fees are essential to pay for border checks and strengthen biosecurity measures in Kent to prevent the spread of animal and plant illnesses, people still think they’re too much. Concerned members of the Horticultural Trades Association (HTA) have characterised the policy’s development as rushed. The ramifications for the horticultural sector were brought to light by James Barnes, the chairman of the HTA, who explained that enterprises in this industry are susceptible to the maximum £145 tax because their shipments sometimes include many commodity lines.

These alterations are being put into place against the background of post-Brexit adjustments, in which the UK’s exit from the EU has jolted once smooth trade relations. New border checks will be implemented in stages over the next year, but the costs associated with them have just been revealed, highlighting the real consequences of the UK’s different stance on EU ties.

An important development in the UK’s post-Brexit trade scenario is the introduction of import tariffs for food items. This has far-reaching ramifications for businesses, consumers, and the economy as a whole.


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